Devils Gulch Falls

Angeles National Forest, California, USA

About Devils Gulch Falls


Hiking Distance: about 10.8 miles round trip (falls only); about 12.6 miles round trip (including bridge)
Suggested Time: allow at least 7 hours (falls only); allow at least 9 hours (for both falls & bridge)

Date first visited: 2022-01-21
Date last visited: 2022-04-01

Waterfall Latitude: 34.28049
Waterfall Longitude: -117.75463

Waterfall Safety and Common Sense

Devils Gulch Falls is perhaps the most impressive of the waterfalls near the very popular Bridge To Nowhere deep in the Sheep Mountain Wilderness of the San Gabriel Mountains.

Although I’m under the impression that everyone in the Greater Los Angeles area (or those visiting) have hiked to the Bridge to Nowhere, very few of these people know about this waterfall.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_406_01212022 - Devils Gulch Falls
Devils Gulch Falls

A big reason for this waterfall’s obscurity is largely due to the fact that it’s not obvious how to access it.

Even though it’s literally quite close to the Bridge to Nowhere, the East Fork Trail to the bridge is already a day-long hike to begin with, which involves multiple crossings of the San Gabriel River.

However, accessing Devils Gulch Falls requires a bit of a rough detour that required us to cross the river a few more times as well as a rough scramble within the Devils Gulch itself.

As a result, unless you have a very good sense of reading maps and identifying landmarks in the field (or you’re already familiar with the area), it’s not likely you’re going to find this waterfall on the same day you’re doing the Bridge to Nowhere.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_392_01212022 - Profile of the Devils Gulch Falls as seen from its secluded alcove
Profile of the Devils Gulch Falls as seen from its secluded alcove

In our case, we actually ran out of daylight since we did this hike in late January, where we already have to contend with the short days of winter.

What Is Involved With The Devils Gulch Falls Hike?

For all intents and purposes, doing an out-and-back hike to the Devils Gulch Falls is an all-day affair where it was about 10.8 miles round-trip according to my GPS logs.

This doesn’t even include the Bridge to Nowhere, which would add nearly another 2 miles round trip (or another 4 miles round-trip without the descent on the steep road embankments).

On our first visit, it took us over 8.5 hours away from the car to complete the hike to just the waterfall and back, and this was barely enough time for us to be back at the car when it got dark in late January.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_049_iPhone_01212022 - The Devils Gulch Falls hike (let alone the Bridge to Nowhere) involves a lot of crossings of the San Gabriel River.  You'll just have to get used to it with this adventure
The Devils Gulch Falls hike (let alone the Bridge to Nowhere) involves a lot of crossings of the San Gabriel River. You’ll just have to get used to it with this adventure

If you’re wondering why it took us so long to do this hike, a large part of it had to do with crossing (or at least wading in) the San Gabriel River a bunch of times.

During our January 2022 visit, the river was primarily knee-deep in its worst spots though we still had to pay careful attention to where we were going because it was easy to get into even deeper sections of the river and get swept away in the current.

Trekking poles and shoes that could both grip the surfaces and get wet (i.e. let out water) were absolutely critical for us to safely complete the hike without injuries to ourselves nor damage to our equipment.

There were also plenty of moments where we had lost the trail (a major consideration if this is your first time), but we figured out where we went wrong on subsequent visits so it went a lot faster on those later visits.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_269_01212022 - Somewhere along the way to the Devils Gulch Falls, we lost the East Fork Trail, and we had to skirt by sketchy sections like this, which was next to some pretty deep and fast-moving parts of the San Gabriel River
Somewhere along the way to the Devils Gulch Falls, we lost the East Fork Trail, and we had to skirt by sketchy sections like this, which was next to some pretty deep and fast-moving parts of the San Gabriel River

That said, if you do get lost, realize that you generally just have to follow the river most of the way to get to the Bridge to Nowhere (as well as the Devils Gulch Falls).

Needless to say, despite the popularity of the Bridge to Nowhere, it is not for everyone.

Given that, the detour to the Devils Gulch Falls is even more challenging despite missing out on most of the 1000ft elevation gain to the bridge.

Devils Gulch Falls Trail Summary

The out-and-back Devils Gulch Hike can be broken down as follows (distances approximate):

  • Dry hiking for the first 0.5-mile to Heaton Flat
  • Rougher hiking with river crossings and/or wadings for the next mile or so until the “graffiti wall”
  • Dry hiking for the next 1.9-2.0 miles from near a ruin by the “graffiti wall” to the next crossing near Allison Gulch
  • Dry hiking for the next 0.75-mile with some mild cliff exposure to next crossing
  • Dry hiking interlude for the next 0.1-mile on the west side of the San Gabriel River before next crossing
  • Hiking 0.1-mile to the deviation with the East Fork Trail (Bridge to Nowhere is another 1.3 miles from here)
  • Dry hiking another 0.5-mile to the next crossing of the San Gabriel River (by a mechanical relic)
  • Dry hiking another 0.4-mile on the west side of the San Gabriel River to the next river crossing
  • Scrambling 250ft or so to a crossing of the San Gabriel River at the mouth of Devils Gulch
  • Scrambling the final 0.2-mile or so to the Devils Gulch Falls
Devils_Gulch_Falls_374_01212022 - Context of the Devils Gulch Falls and a small cascade fronting it
Context of the Devils Gulch Falls and a small cascade fronting it

As you can see, there are numerous crossings of the San Gabriel River, and it can get pretty confusing to follow the trail, especially at each of the river crossings.

Moreover, as mentioned earlier, this is definitely one hike where I wouldn’t recommend ruining your expensive hiking boots nor would I suggest wearing shoes that are not meant for hiking.

There are enough hazards on this trail that slipping and falling here (especially if in the high-flowing river or on cliff ledges) could cause severe injury or even death.

There is a tradeoff between the waterfall’s performance and the level of the San Gabriel River.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_573_01212022 - Mom and Dad going through knee-deep water with current on the San Gabriel River, which was one of several of such crossings that we encountered
Mom and Dad going through knee-deep water with current on the San Gabriel River, which was one of several of such crossings that we encountered

You see, in order to see the waterfalls flow like Devils Gulch Falls or even Allison Gulch Falls (if you’re up for it), you’ll want to be here not long after the last storm has passed.

However, that also means that the San Gabriel River will be in high flow, and that’s where the hike can be treacherous, especially if you’re not prepared.

It’s already pretty marginal that we managed to do this hike with the water at knee level (the current definitely wanted to knock us over), and we easily could have been swept away had the river crossings been any deeper!

Furthermore, we also encountered a few rockslide and landslide obstacles, including one that was clinging above a dropoff, which I’ll get into in the detailed trail description below.



Trail Description – Heaton Flat and River Crossings

Devils_Gulch_Falls_030_01212022 - Mom passing through the Heaton Flat Picnic Area, where there was one more established restroom facility
Mom passing through the Heaton Flat Picnic Area, where there was one more established restroom facility

Starting from the East Fork Trailhead parking area (see directions below), we pretty much followed the continuation of the East Fork Road past a locked gate.

The road pretty soon became a wide, unpaved road as it gently made a curve before reaching the wide picnic area known as Heaton Flat in the first half-mile.

There was a trail branching to the right between the restroom facility and some trail signs, which is the Heaton Flat Trail leading up to the Iron Mountain Trail and the upper end of the Allison Gulch Trail.

However, we kept to the left to stay closer to the east bank of the San Gabriel River.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_062_01212022 - The first watery interlude into the San Gabriel River not far after passing through the Heaton Flat Picnic Area
The first watery interlude into the San Gabriel River not far after passing through the Heaton Flat Picnic Area

Beyond Heaton Flat, the trail narrowed as it passed by the neighboring infrastructure before skirting along the river itself.

At around 0.9-mile from the trailhead (or around 0.3- to 0.4-mile beyond Heaton Flat), the trail then went into the river, where we’d keep to the right, where the trail continued.

Around another 0.1-mile beyond the end of the first watery interlude, there was a seasonal side waterfall to the right nearby a large whitish tree with some hollowed out trunk and branches.

This waterfall was barely trickling when I saw it on our January 2022 visit, and it was pretty much dry when we came back in early April 2022.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_587_01212022 - This side waterfall off the early part of the East Fork Trail was trickling during our January 2022 visit
This side waterfall off the early part of the East Fork Trail was trickling during our January 2022 visit

In another 0.1-mile beyond the seasonal waterfall and hollowed out tree, that was when we encountered our first legitimate crossing (i.e. it was about knee-deep and looked intimidating) of the San Gabriel River.

Shortly after this crossing, it can get pretty confusing where to go next.

On our first visit, we generally tried to keep to the east side of the river unless it was pretty obvious to stay with the west side and then cross back over.

However, on our second visit, we figured out that the best way to was to cross the river and then look for a trail that rises towards a ledge to the left.

Bridge_to_Nowhere_334_04012022 - We figured out on our second time hiking the East Fork Trail that after the first legitimate crossing of the San Gabriel River, we should have followed this ledge trail instead of staying down by the river
We figured out on our second time hiking the East Fork Trail that after the first legitimate crossing of the San Gabriel River, we should have followed this ledge trail instead of staying down by the river

This trail is very benign and eventually drops down towards a trio of graffiti-laced walls, and that’s where we’d cross back to the east bank of the San Gabriel River.

Had we stayed with the river like we did the first time, then we’d regain the East Fork Trail around the same trio of graffiti walls.

So that graffiti wall is the key landmark to note, and it would mark the last of the river crossings for a while until we get closer to the mouth of Allison Gulch.

By the way, regarding these river crossings, this part of the San Gabriel River sees the most volume since it has been getting fed by tributaries and side streams further up the canyon.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_549_01212022 - Looking towards some graffiti walls near the last of the San Gabriel River crossings in the lower section of the canyon
Looking towards some graffiti walls near the last of the San Gabriel River crossings in the lower section of the canyon

That’s why most of the river crossings for this hike happen within the first two miles.

Trail Description – Dry Hiking from the Ruins to Allison Gulch

For almost the next 2 miles of the hike, we pretty much stayed dry as the East Fork Trail would pretty much go through a much wider and more open part of the canyon.

Early on in this stretch of the hike, there was an intriguing ruin that was easily missed off to the right of the East Fork Trail.

I wasn’t sure what this ruin was for, but it was clear that many people have seen it before as evidenced by some unsightly tagging and litter around it.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_127_01212022 - Looking back at some kind of ruin near the start of the extensive dry hiking stretch as the canyon started to open up
Looking back at some kind of ruin near the start of the extensive dry hiking stretch as the canyon started to open up

Anyways, the next long stretch of the hike went through a wide wash full of yucca patches and boulders along the way before the trail started climbing near Shoemaker Canyon.

At this point, the trail veered more in an easterly direction as it stayed to the south of the San Gabriel River and managed to cling to ledges and traverse some rock slides without the need to cross the river.

There was one spot where we found some steps and rock holds to avoid a river crossing, and there may be a spraypainted arrow hint to point that out.

Eventually, as the trail veered back to the north, it crossed a bridge over the mouth of Laurel Gulch before reaching a sign denoting the boundary of the Sheep Mountain Wilderness.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_229_01212022 - Sign indicating that we were entering the Sheep Mountain Wilderness shortly after the footbridge over the seasonal stream from Laurel Gulch
Sign indicating that we were entering the Sheep Mountain Wilderness shortly after the footbridge over the seasonal stream from Laurel Gulch

In about the next 0.4-mile beyond the Sheep Mountain Wilderness sign, that was when we finally encountered the next crossing of the San Gabriel River.

During this stretch of dry hiking, if you look up and across the river, you might notice Swan Rock, which is a section of cliff that had a pattern of what looked like a swan.

On our first visit, we were pretty focused on hiking and paying attention to where we were walking so we actually missed noticing Swan Rock at the time (I only noticed it in hindsight after looking back my photos)!

At the river crossing beyond Swan Rock, it was actually quite confusing to figure out where to go next.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_240_01212022 - The East Fork Trail clinging to ledges flanked by yucca plants. If you look carefully, you might notice Swan Rock in the shadow, which we actually didn't notice since we were paying attention to the ledges
The East Fork Trail clinging to ledges flanked by yucca plants. If you look carefully, you might notice Swan Rock in the shadow, which we actually didn’t notice since we were paying attention to the ledges

In hindsight, we should have crossed and then crossed back to pick up the trail back on the east side of the river near the mouth of Allison Gulch, where there’s a dam remnant and a side cascade spilling by the dam wall.

On our first visit, we actually kept to the left of the river and had to weave through a lot of yucca patches as well as some dicey scrambling besides some cascades and pools on the San Gabriel River.

Trail Description – From Allison Gulch to the East Fork Deviation

Sticking with the East Fork Trail on the east side of the San Gabriel River near Allison Gulch, there was a spur trail that veered off into Allison Gulch.

That’s a different adventure to another waterfall called the Allison Gulch Falls, which is not easy to reach.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_074_iPhone_01212022 - An interesting sign about a Bigfoot Crossing near the mouth of Allison Gulch
An interesting sign about a Bigfoot Crossing near the mouth of Allison Gulch

In any case, continuing with the East Fork Trail, it passed by an interesting sign saying something about “Bigfoot Crossing” before the trail then continued to cling onto ledges.

In one particular stretch, we encountered a spot where the trail was covered in a steep landslide during our January 2022 visit.

It was so narrow that it made some hikers that were following us (who had the wrong shoes on) turn back because they couldn’t keep their footing.

This was one stretch where having our trekking poles as well as grippy hiking shoes helped out a lot to get over this particular obstacle (though it wasn’t as sketchy when we came back in early April 2022).

Devils_Gulch_Falls_487_01212022 - A landslide obstacle that proved to be very difficult for the trio of hikers you see in this picture because they didn't have the right shoes (especially without trekking poles) to maintain traction
A landslide obstacle that proved to be very difficult for the trio of hikers you see in this picture because they didn’t have the right shoes (especially without trekking poles) to maintain traction

The trail then pretty much continued following the old road’s trajectory before dropping back down into the canyon again and crossing the river to its west side before crossing back over to the east side not long thereafter (just after a cascade).

Once back on the east side of the river, the trail then went into a wide open part of the canyon where we can easily see the line in the cliff rising up out of the canyon, which was the former road leading the last mile to the Bridge to Nowhere.

However, it was in this open stretch that we noticed an unsigned fork (easy to miss).

Keeping right at this unsigned fork would eventually climb up to meet up with the road leading the rest of the way to the Bridge to Nowhere.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_073_iPhone_01212022 - The easy-to-miss deviation from the East Fork Trail to the Bridge to Nowhere, where we pursued Devils Gulch Falls instead of that bridge
The easy-to-miss deviation from the East Fork Trail to the Bridge to Nowhere, where we pursued Devils Gulch Falls instead of that bridge

However, we were interested in going to the Devils Gulch so we kept left at this fork to stay within the canyon floor.

Trail Description – Scrambling To Devils Gulch And Devils Gulch Falls

Continuing on the informal path within the wide open canyon floor, we pretty much route-found our way through more yucca patches as far north as we could along the east side of the San Gabriel River.

Eventually, after another half-mile of this, we then encountered the next river crossing, where there was some kind of mechanical relic partially submerged kind of acting as a landmark here.

Beyond this river crossing, we then continued hiking through more yucca patches as the trail became less defined while we’d persist along the west side of the river going past the confluence with Rattlesnake Canyon.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_340_01212022 - The mechanical relic at the first crossing of the San Gabriel River after deviating from the East Fork Trail
The mechanical relic at the first crossing of the San Gabriel River after deviating from the East Fork Trail

This west bank interlude ultimately led us to the “trail” disappearing into the river again.

So, we crossed back to the east side, went past some kind of cable infrastructure, then passed some litter patch, before finally crossing the river yet again at the mouth of Devils Gulch.

During our January 2022 visit, there was a tiny waterfall right at the mouth of the gulch.

The easiest way for us to get into the Devils Gulch was to keep to the left of this waterfall before crossing over its tributary stream and do our scrambling to the right side, which involved a bit of bouldering and some mild bushwhacking.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_431_01212022 - Context of the out-of-place chimney just a short distance downstream of the Devils Gulch Falls
Context of the out-of-place chimney just a short distance downstream of the Devils Gulch Falls

After getting over a couple of boulder obstacles, the scramble then led us towards a spot where we managed to climb up to some odd concrete platform that was fronting an odd and out-of-place chimney.

We have no idea why nor how that chimney was there to begin with, but we knew from the presence of tagging that quite a few people have been here before to deface even this hidden spot.

Shortly after the chimney, that was when we finally arrived at the Devils Gulch Falls, which sat in a tight enclave with overhangs and some bare tree whose branches blocked any clean view of the entirety of the falls.

We had to scramble right up to the plunge pool beyond the tree to finally get a clean look at the waterfall, but its size (which I’m guessing is at least 40-50ft or so) made it hard to capture it properly in one shot.

Trail Description – Continuing to the Bridge to Nowhere

Bridge_to_Nowhere_074_04012022 - If you look closely in this photograph, you might people towards the center-right climbing up to the former East Fork Road, and that was the route leading to the Bridge to Nowhere
If you look closely in this photograph, you might people towards the center-right climbing up to the former East Fork Road, and that was the route leading to the Bridge to Nowhere

To my knowledge, perhaps the safest thing to do to leave Devils Gulch and continue to the Bridge to Nowhere would be to backtrack nearly a mile to the East Fork Deviation.

And then, rejoin the East Fork Trail and follow it for the remaining 1.4 miles or so on the road leading to the Bridge to Nowhere high above the San Gabriel River.

However, on our second visit, we learned that there is a cutoff trail further upstream of Devils Gulch that rejoins the East Fork Trail closer to the Bridge to Nowhere.

However, it didn’t seem obvious to us how far you had to go upstream along the San Gabriel River before climbing up to the East Fork Road.

Bridge_to_Nowhere_118_04012022 - Looking across the famous Bridge to Nowhere
Looking across the famous Bridge to Nowhere

As a result, I’d recommend doing this cutoff route in reverse (i.e. going to the Bridge to Nowhere first, then Devils Gulch Falls).

The full write-up for just the hike to the Bridge to Nowhere is on a separate page, which has its own set of cascades on the San Gabriel River itself.

Now assuming you’ve been to the Bridge to Nowhere and you’re heading back, we’ve managed to find the unsigned cutoff trail leading about 1/4-mile down to the San Gabriel River about a half-mile upstream of the mouth of Devil’s Gulch.

This was roughly a half-mile from the Bridge to Nowhere itself (near a sign indicating you’re entering the Bridge to Nowhere along with a “No Drone Zone” warning).

Bridge_to_Nowhere_218_04012022 - Approaching the cutoff trail near the southernmost of the Bridge to Nowhere signs
Approaching the cutoff trail near the southernmost of the Bridge to Nowhere signs

Believe it or not, this cutoff trail seemed to be surprisingly well-used or at least well-maintained as we noticed a rock cairn as well as an obvious use-trail that wasn’t too hard to follow.

Anyways, once we’re done with the hike, it was time to head back to the East Fork Trailhead, which was curiously much easier, especially given some red arrows painted on rocks to help lead the way.

Again, I wasn’t sure if these red arrows (and blue going the other way) were sanctioned and created by the bungee jumping company that runs the jumps from the Bridge to Nowhere, or if they were just taggers trying to be helpful.

All I know is that for the most part, the arrows were indeed helpful on the return hike, and it made us realize that we perhaps made more crossings of the San Gabriel River than what was necessary in each of our first two visits here.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_459_01212022 - Arrows helping to point the way back from the Bridge to Nowhere (as well as the Devils Gulch Falls) to regain the East Fork Trailhead
Arrows helping to point the way back from the Bridge to Nowhere (as well as the Devils Gulch Falls) to regain the East Fork Trailhead

Of course, hindsight is always 20/20, but at least now we know, and any future visits will be made easier as a result.

Overall, our hike out-and-back hike on our first visit to Devils Gulch Falls took us about 8.5 hours away from the car (and we barely made it back in time before it got dark).

Of that time, it took us 3.5 hours on the return hike and nearly 4.5 hours on the way there with a half-hour break at the Devils Gulch Falls.

On our second visit, we made it up to the Bridge to Nowhere and its neighboring cascades, and then we took a cutoff trail leading directly to the Devils Gulch Falls.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_081_iPhone_01212022 - In the final stretch between Heaton Flat and the East Fork Trailhead just as it became dark on our first visit in January 2022
In the final stretch between Heaton Flat and the East Fork Trailhead just as it became dark on our first visit in January 2022

Then, we returned to the East Fork Trail the same way we went out on our first visit, which ultimately completed a loop that my GPS logs suggested was about 12.6 miles long.

What’s With The Bridge To Nowhere Anyways?

The Bridge to Nowhere was actually the lone finished bridge that was part of route that would have linked Wrightwood with the rest of the LA Basin to the south near Azusa.

This project took place in the 1930s, which was an interesting time because quite a few ambitious works were in progress or operating under the belief that technology could overcome various obstacles posed by Nature (e.g. the Mt Lowe Railway).

Unfortunately, Nature regained control through a series of severe floods and landslides leaving only the completed bridge over the San Gabriel River that would now become known as the Bridge to Nowhere.

Devils_Gulch_Falls_513_01212022 - Looking back at a section of concrete or asphalt on the East Fork Trail, which is evidence of the once ambitious project that sought to connect the LA Basin with Wrightwood through the San Gabriel Mountains instead of the I-15
Looking back at a section of concrete or asphalt on the East Fork Trail, which is evidence of the once ambitious project that sought to connect the LA Basin with Wrightwood through the San Gabriel Mountains instead of the I-15

Like with the Mt Lowe Railway, the calamities proved too costly to overcome (let alone maintain such works) and thus were abandoned.

Therefore, the East Fork Trail pretty much followed most of this former road, and some remnants of the project could still be seen to this day (e.g. asphalt and concrete surfaces).

Authorities

Devils Gulch Falls is in the Angeles National Forest within the Sheep Mountain Wilderness near Azusa in Los Angeles County, California. It is administered by the USDA Forest Service. For information or inquiries about this area as well as current conditions, visit the Angeles National Forest website or Facebook page.

Bridge_to_Nowhere_006_04012022 - Back at the East Fork Trailhead on our second attempt of the Bridge to Nowhere, which took place in April Fools 2022.  The next several photos took place on this hike
Bridge_to_Nowhere_008_04012022 - Unlike our first time over 2 months ago, the skies were actually a bit more overcast as there was a marine layer that had yet to burn off
Bridge_to_Nowhere_009_04012022 - Another look at Mom on the East Fork Trail underneath the marine layer during our April 2022 visit
Bridge_to_Nowhere_011_04012022 - Mom going past a puddle at Heaton Flat and continuing on with the Bridge to Nowhere hike
Bridge_to_Nowhere_013_04012022 - Something that I noticed on our second visit was this sign talking about invasive New Zealand Mudsnails
Bridge_to_Nowhere_017_04012022 - This side waterfall didn't have a prayer of flowing 2 months after I saw it trickling on our first visit
Bridge_to_Nowhere_019_04012022 - Mom wading in the first legitimate crossing of the San Gabriel River (in hindsight, we should have finished the crossing and taken the left trail to the graffiti walls)
Bridge_to_Nowhere_021_04012022 - At least during our river wade, we did notice some attractively colored wildflowers as Spring was in full effect at the East Fork Trail
Bridge_to_Nowhere_024_04012022 - Making it up to the series of graffiti walls, where we saw another party actually do the trail properly, and that gave us the idea that perhaps they knew something we didn't
Bridge_to_Nowhere_025_04012022 - Going back past this ruin on the way to the Bridge to Nowhere and Devils Gulch Falls on our second visit, which took place in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_031_04012022 - Looking back at Mom as the marine layer seemed to start burning off during our April 2022 visit
Bridge_to_Nowhere_007_iPhone_04012022 - Looking back up at the cliff that caused the rockfall that we had to traverse during the extensive dry hiking between the graffiti wall and the vicinity of Swan Rock
Bridge_to_Nowhere_040_04012022 - During our 2nd attempt to the Bridge to Nowhere, I noticed this plant with leaves that seemed to have pimples on them. Not sure if it was diseased or if it supposed to be this way
Bridge_to_Nowhere_009_iPhone_04012022 - Swan Rock kind of blended in with the rest of the cliffs around it during our early Spring visit as the sun was higher on the horizon and yielded less contrast so it was harder to notice the cliff formation
Bridge_to_Nowhere_046_04012022 - Mom wading in the San Gabriel River somewhere near the mouth of Allison Gulch
Bridge_to_Nowhere_051_04012022 - Mom getting past the mouth of Allison Gulch and continuing on the Bridge to Nowhere
Bridge_to_Nowhere_052_04012022 - The familiar Bigfoot Crossing sign as well as someone putting a new sticker with an altered photo that made Joe Biden look like a demon as seen during our early April 2022 visit
Bridge_to_Nowhere_010_iPhone_04012022 - When we reached this landslide obstacle, it seemed to be a bit wider and less sketchier during our early April 2022 visit compared to our late January 2022 visit when it was way narrower than this
Bridge_to_Nowhere_060_04012022 - Closeup look at some pretty neat-looking star-shaped wildflowers blooming by the East Fork Trail in April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_063_04012022 - More wildflowers blooming by the East Fork Trail in April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_084_04012022 - When we made it to the trail climbing up to the Bridge to Nowhere, we looked back at the wide wash and yucca patch that we had scrambled in to get to the Devils Gulch Falls on our first visit
Bridge_to_Nowhere_089_04012022 - Context of the climbing 'road' leading to the Bridge to Nowhere. Notice how steep the embankments were, which was why it wasn't all that obvious that there's a shortcut between this trail and the Devil's Gulch
Bridge_to_Nowhere_090_04012022 - Mom traversing another landslide obstacle as we were getting closer to a blast zone on the way to the Bridge to Nowhere in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_094_04012022 - Mom going through a blast zone (where they must have blasted rock to make way for the East Fork Road leading to the Bridge to Nowhere
Bridge_to_Nowhere_096_04012022 - Mom going past the first sign indicating that we were nearing the Bridge to Nowhere. The cutoff trail to Devil's Gulch was actually close to this sign
Bridge_to_Nowhere_098_04012022 - Looking down at the context of the cutoff trail leading down a shortcut towards the mouth of Devils Gulch another 1/2-mile or so further downstream
Bridge_to_Nowhere_100_04012022 - Approaching private infrastructure fronting the Bridge to Nowhere
Bridge_to_Nowhere_110_04012022 - Finally making it to the Bridge to Nowhere.  Hard to believe that this was my first time being here, and it wasn't until April 2022 that we made it!
Bridge_to_Nowhere_114_04012022 - Looking down at the context of some smaller cascades on the San Gabriel River as seen from the Bridge to Nowhere.  These cascades I'd imagine actually had plunge pools that served as swimming holes
Bridge_to_Nowhere_125_04012022 - Looking down at a series of cascades on the San Gabriel River after crossing the Bridge to Nowhere
Bridge_to_Nowhere_132_04012022 - Making our way back across the Bridge to Nowhere as we started to target the Devils Gulch Falls on our early April 2022 visit
Bridge_to_Nowhere_225_04012022 - After descending the cutoff trail, we were surprised to see this rock cairn on the northern approach to the mouth of Devils Gulch in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_229_04012022 - Looking back at Mom continuing to follow the cutoff trail towards Devils Gulch though we still had to contend with prickly yucca
Bridge_to_Nowhere_231_04012022 - Noticing some steel cable ties, which was further evidence of a road or some kind of infrastructure that was once in this part of the East Fork
Bridge_to_Nowhere_234_04012022 - Mom wading across the San Gabriel River as we were getting closer to the mouth of Devils Gulch in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_237_04012022 - Mom wading back across the San Gabriel River towards the mouth of Devils Gulch in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_239_04012022 - Crossing in front of this small cascade within Devils Gulch on the way up to the Devils Gulch Falls
Bridge_to_Nowhere_242_04012022 - Another cascade obstacle within Devils Gulch on the way to the Devils Gulch Falls in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_244_04012022 - Approaching Devils Gulch Falls through some Spring overgrowth as we finally made it back in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_246_04012022 - Mom approaching the base of Devils Gulch Falls in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_247_04012022 - Back at the Devils Gulch Falls in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_248_04012022 - Mom checking out Devils Gulch Falls in Spring during our early April 2022 visit
Bridge_to_Nowhere_252_04012022 - Another look at Mom checking out the Devils Gulch Falls in April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_261_04012022 - Side view of the Devils Gulch Falls as seen in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_265_04012022 - Mom standing before the Devils Gulch Falls in early April 2022, where she provides a sense of scale of the size of the waterfall
Bridge_to_Nowhere_268_04012022 - Looking up towards the brink of the Devils Gulch Falls in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_272_04012022 - Profile of Devils Gulch Falls as seen from the other side of its plunge pool in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_288_04012022 - Mom heading back from Devils Gulch Falls as she went past the familiar out-of-place chimney though it seemed much more overgrown in early April 2022 than it did in late January 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_290_04012022 - Mom going back the same way we did when we first did this hike so we wouldn't have to backtrack to the East Fork Trail on our early April 2022 visit
Bridge_to_Nowhere_291_04012022 - Clearly someone set up a fire pit and overnighted near the Devils Gulch as seen in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_301_04012022 - Mom continuing on the hike back from Devils Gulch to the East Fork Trail in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_304_04012022 - Continuing on the hike back along the East Fork Trail in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_307_04012022 - Mom going back along the ledge on the East Fork Trail as we made our way back after having had our fill of both the Bridge to Nowhere and the Devils Gulch Falls in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_312_04012022 - Mom making it back to Swan Rock with a bit more daylight now in early April 2022 than we did in late January 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_317_04012022 - Approaching some hikers who spotted a bighorn sheep during our early April 2022 visit
Bridge_to_Nowhere_319_04012022 - The bighorn sheep that we noticed on our return hike along the East Fork Trail in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_327_04012022 - Mom approaching the ruins near the graffiti walls on the return hike, where we now had to get wet again before ending off our early April hike
Bridge_to_Nowhere_330_04012022 - Mom back at the graffiti walls and about to cross the San Gabriel River in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_333_04012022 - Mom going past the last of the graffiti walls and now following a seemingly obvious ledge trail eventually leading to the first legit crossing of the San Gabriel River in early April 2022
Bridge_to_Nowhere_335_04012022 - With the trail being this obvious, I couldn't believe that we had missed it all this time!  Well at least now we know that the next time we come back and do Allison Gulch, at least the East Fork Trail will be much easier to get going
Bridge_to_Nowhere_336_04012022 - Mom going back along the last water encounter before the home stretch leading to the East Fork Trailhead to cap off our early April 2022 hike
Bridge_to_Nowhere_338_04012022 - Finally making it back to the East Fork Trailhead to end our successful early April 2022 hike
Devils_Gulch_Falls_011_01212022 - Looking towards the gate marking the start of the hike to the Bridge to Nowhere as well as the Devils Gulch Falls. This photo and the rest of the photos in this gallery was taken in late January 2022, which was our first time here.
Devils_Gulch_Falls_001_iPhone_01212022 - Looking into the canyon carved out by the East Fork San Gabriel River from the East Fork Trailhead
Devils_Gulch_Falls_021_01212022 - Looking back towards the East Fork Trailhead parking area as we were making our way to Heaton Flat
Devils_Gulch_Falls_025_01212022 - Mom and Dad following the fairly benign trail leading to Heaton Flat along the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_026_01212022 - Mom and Dad passing by this little landslide area, which goes to show you that Nature is always at work even in an easy part like this
Devils_Gulch_Falls_031_01212022 - Context of some signage at Heaton Flat with the Heaton Flat Trail leaving the East Fork Trail to the right side of this picture
Devils_Gulch_Falls_034_01212022 - Mom approaching some signage (defaced with graffiti) near a dam wall beyond Heaton Flat
Devils_Gulch_Falls_035_01212022 - You think you can read this sign after all the tagging that happened on it? This would be a bit of a shameful theme going on in the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_039_01212022 - Mom and Dad descending these steps beyond the Heaton Flat area as the trail began to narrow and get a bit rougher from here on out
Devils_Gulch_Falls_042_01212022 - Mom and Dad descending this rocky ledge towards the level of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_055_01212022 - Encountering our first traverse of the San Gabriel River though in this section, we encountered a Hispanic family that were actually on their way back when apparently they brought an elderly woman who was not having a good time (I think this family severely underestimated the difficulty)
Devils_Gulch_Falls_066_01212022 - Dad skirting the right side of the river in our initial traverse
Devils_Gulch_Falls_072_01212022 - Besides rocks and cliffs, even some trees couldn't escape the spray-paint assault of taggers along the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_078_01212022 - Mom and Dad keeping to the right of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_083_01212022 - This was the first legitimate crossing of the San Gabriel River, where we had to go through fast-moving knee-deep water to get to the other side
Devils_Gulch_Falls_090_01212022 - Mom going back to the other side of the San Gabriel River shortly after the initial crossing
Devils_Gulch_Falls_095_01212022 - Dad and Mom making another crossing of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_098_01212022 - Mom and Dad now keeping to the left side of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_103_01212022 - We were starting to run out of real-estate as we had to start looking for a way to get back across the river to the east side
Devils_Gulch_Falls_104_01212022 - Dad making his way across the San Gabriel River to get back to the east side
Devils_Gulch_Falls_109_01212022 - Dad and Mom trying to follow along the east side of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_113_01212022 - It didn't take long before we had to go back into the San Gabriel River again
Devils_Gulch_Falls_115_01212022 - Looking back at Mom making her wade of the San Gabriel River while still staying on the east side
Devils_Gulch_Falls_118_01212022 - Dad and Mom skirting alongside the east bank of the San Gabriel River, which was right across from some graffiti walls. This marked the start of a fairly long stretch of dry hiking as the canyon started to open up
Devils_Gulch_Falls_122_01212022 - I noticed this ruin shortly after the graffiti wall and the last of the initial river crossings
Devils_Gulch_Falls_126_01212022 - Another look at the ruins where there's some litter and tagging around it
Devils_Gulch_Falls_129_01212022 - Mom and Dad going through an open stretch of the canyon where the East Fork Trail weaved between some yucca patches
Devils_Gulch_Falls_139_01212022 - Mom and Dad still making their way through the open section of the canyon well within the extensive dry hiking stretch of the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_144_01212022 - Weaving between yucca plants as the trail started to climb somewhere near Shoemaker Canyon
Devils_Gulch_Falls_147_01212022 - Closer look at some asphalt remnants, which are relics of when they tried to build a road to the Bridge to Nowhere in the 1930s
Devils_Gulch_Falls_154_01212022 - Mom and Dad continuing along this ledge that once supported the road encompassing the route to the Bridge to Nowhere and eventually Wrightwood
Devils_Gulch_Falls_159_01212022 - Dad and Mom skirting along the San Gabriel River next to some graffiti, which was annoying everpresent throughout this hike
Devils_Gulch_Falls_165_01212022 - Looking upstream towards some series of rapids and cascades on the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_170_01212022 - Looking across the uppermost of the rapids and cascades in this stretch of the San Gabriel River along the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_180_01212022 - Mom and Dad going up this rocky incline and steps to avoid crossing the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_182_01212022 - Mom and Dad on a ledge clinging to the canyon wall as the dry hiking persisted between the graffiti wall and Allison Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_187_01212022 - Mom and Dad going between this patch of yucca as we continued the extensive dry hiking stretch along the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_196_01212022 - Mom and Dad passing by more unfortunate graffiti along the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_210_01212022 - Mom still on the long stretch of dry hiking as we were still making our way to Allison Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_219_01212022 - Mom and Dad still on this ledge portion of the trail as we were still dry hiking en route to Allison Gulch along the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_231_01212022 - Mom and Dad making a steep rocky descent shortly after entering the Sheep Mountain Wilderness
Devils_Gulch_Falls_232_01212022 - Mom and Dad continuing the steep descent until we encountered these hikers who said that we were only about 30% of the way to the Bridge to Nowhere
Devils_Gulch_Falls_235_01212022 - Dad and Mom passing through another open part of the canyon. Note that Swan Rock is in the shadows up ahead, but we didn't even pay attention to it. I just happened to notice it when looking through the pictures
Devils_Gulch_Falls_239_01212022 - Mom and Dad going onto a climbing part of the East Fork Trail before Swan Rock. Notice how our heads were down, which was why we didn't even notice that rock!
Devils_Gulch_Falls_242_01212022 - Mom and Dad having traversed this rocky slope along the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_245_01212022 - Too bad some people don't practice leave no trace principles, and this wasn't the only time we saw shameful acts of littering like this
Devils_Gulch_Falls_247_01212022 - Still continuing the dry hiking though we could start to see Allison Gulch up ahead
Devils_Gulch_Falls_249_01212022 - Mom about to figure out whether to go into the river or climb up and over the big rock boulder obstacles to her right near the mouth of Allison Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_251_01212022 - Dad going across the San Gabriel River near the mouth of Allison Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_257_01212022 - After Mom had to change shoes, she then had to go across this knee-deep traverse of the San Gabriel River near Allison Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_260_01212022 - On the way up, instead of crossing back over towards the mouth of Allison Gulch, we actually stayed to the left of the river and had to traverse this yucca patch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_265_01212022 - Dad skirting alongside the base of this cliff wall as we were starting to run out of real-estate again on the west bank of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_036_iPhone_01212022 - Dad carefully making his way past this rapids obstacle as the trail really narrowed and squeezed us close to the San Gabriel River in one of its more deeper and faster moving sections
Devils_Gulch_Falls_279_01212022 - Mom and Dad going through yet another extensive yucca patch on the west side of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_282_01212022 - Mom going across the San Gabriel River when we ran out of real-estate on the west side
Devils_Gulch_Falls_289_01212022 - Dad and Mom pretty much stream wading the right side of the San Gabriel River as we were kind of aimlessly figuring out how we had lost the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_295_01212022 - Eventually, we regained the trail which was once again straightforward to follow
Devils_Gulch_Falls_297_01212022 - We knew we were back on track after seeing this spraypainted blue arrow
Devils_Gulch_Falls_302_01212022 - Dad making another traverse of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_307_01212022 - Looking back at Mom carefully making her way across one of the more deeper crossings of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_314_01212022 - Dad back on the west side of the San Gabriel River as we still pursued the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_315_01212022 - Dad and Mom still sticking with the trail on the west side of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_317_01212022 - Dad and Mom running out of real-estate on the west side and about to approach the next crossing of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_319_01212022 - Dad and Mom going across one of the trickier stream crossings near a confluence of two streams
Devils_Gulch_Falls_320_01212022 - Looking back at Dad and Mom making perhaps one of the trickier traverses of the San Gabriel River before getting back to the east side
Devils_Gulch_Falls_321_01212022 - Another shameful display of littering by the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_327_01212022 - Mom and Dad deviating from the East Fork Trail and now committed to pursuing the Devils Gulch Falls
Devils_Gulch_Falls_339_01212022 - Eventually our deviation from the East Fork Trail led us to this crossing of the San Gabriel River by some kind of partially-submerged relic
Devils_Gulch_Falls_343_01212022 - Mom going across the San Gabriel River yet again
Devils_Gulch_Falls_348_01212022 - Looking back at Mom and Dad catching up to me while making it through this open yucca and boulder field on the west side of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_350_01212022 - Starting to run out of real estate again as we were about to encounter the next crossing of the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_353_01212022 - Looking back at Mom and Dad about to make yet another crossing of the San Gabriel River somewhere near the Devils Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_359_01212022 - Going past a rather shameful display of littering near the mouth of Devils Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_362_01212022 - Dad and Mom making the last traverse of the San Gabriel River right at the mouth of Devils Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_366_01212022 - One of the cascade obstacles on the way up Devils Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_368_01212022 - It was a little rough going to go up Devils Gulch in pursuit of the Devils Gulch Falls
Devils_Gulch_Falls_369_01212022 - A surprising concrete platform and chimney within Devils Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_371_01212022 - Closer look at a chimney within Devils Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_375_01212022 - Finally getting our first look at the Devils Gulch Falls Mom had to change shoes, she then had to go across this knee-deep traverse of the San Gabriel River near Allison Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_379_01212022 - Frontal look at the impressive Devils Gulch Falls
Devils_Gulch_Falls_395_01212022 - Checking out the plunge pool at the bottom of the Devils Gulch Falls
Devils_Gulch_Falls_399_01212022 - Looking across the base of Devils Gulch Falls
Devils_Gulch_Falls_059_iPhone_01212022 - Context of me before the Devils Gulch Falls
Devils_Gulch_Falls_426_01212022 - Last look back at the Devils Gulch Falls before we headed out before it got dark
Devils_Gulch_Falls_436_01212022 - Dad and Mom making their way out of Devils Gulch and back along the San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_441_01212022 - Dad and Mom passing by the shameful litter pile again near Devils Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_452_01212022 - Somehow we missed the river crossing that we took on the way in so we had to find a shallower spot on the way back
Devils_Gulch_Falls_453_01212022 - Mom and Dad catching up to me as we went back through the yucca patch to regain the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_457_01212022 - Looking back at Dad and Mom going in opposite directions to demonstrate where we had deviated from the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_458_01212022 - On the return hike, we found these red spraypainted arrows to be quite helpful to navigate our way back to the East Fork Trailhead
Devils_Gulch_Falls_461_01212022 - Looking back at the context of Dad having crossed the San Gabriel River with another trio of hikers who were catching up to us on the other side
Devils_Gulch_Falls_463_01212022 - Looking back at Dad and Mom going back across another deeper crossing of the San Gabriel River on the return to East Fork Trailhead
Devils_Gulch_Falls_470_01212022 - Following the red arrows took us up to this ledge as the trail seemed to climb up to the former location of the road
Devils_Gulch_Falls_485_01212022 - Mom going across a rather sketchy landslide traverse on the way back from Devils Gulch Falls
Devils_Gulch_Falls_495_01212022 - Looking back over some small cascade at the mouth of Allison Gulch
Devils_Gulch_Falls_501_01212022 - Looking back at Dad going across the San Gabriel River near the mouth of Allison Gulch. I suspect that this was where we made a mistake on the way up as we stuck to the west side of the river instead of going back to the east side towards the Allison Gulch confluence
Devils_Gulch_Falls_505_01212022 - Context of Mom on the East Fork Trail with Swan Rock showing in the background
Devils_Gulch_Falls_512_01212022 - Dad and Mom following more red spraypainted arrows helping us to find the way back to the East Fork Trailhead
Devils_Gulch_Falls_522_01212022 - Dad and Mom traversing this rockslide obstacle on the way back to the East Fork Trailhead
Devils_Gulch_Falls_527_01212022 - Dad and Mom still making their way back to the trailhead as the late afternoon sun was setting fast
Devils_Gulch_Falls_534_01212022 - Dad and Mom still making their way back to the East Fork Trailhead with the sun continuing to hide behind the canyon walls
Devils_Gulch_Falls_543_01212022 - One of the dicier obstacles that we encountered on the way back to the East Fork Trailhead, where somehow we must have missed the proper approach because someone else whizzed right by us from below
Devils_Gulch_Falls_557_01212022 - Dad making another one of the river traverses as were getting closer to the last of the crossings
Devils_Gulch_Falls_559_01212022 - Mom going into the San Gabriel River again, which was also pretty deep here
Devils_Gulch_Falls_565_01212022 - Looking back at Mom and Dad about to make the final crossing of San Gabriel River
Devils_Gulch_Falls_576_01212022 - Dad somewhere between the last deep traverse of San Gabriel River and the last shallow wading section near Heaton Flat
Devils_Gulch_Falls_579_01212022 - Checking out some interesting hollowed out tree near a seasonal side waterfall by the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_580_01212022 - Context of Dad going by that hollowed out tree on the East Fork Trail
Devils_Gulch_Falls_080_iPhone_01212022 - Checking out a seasonal side waterfall that I had missed on the way up
Devils_Gulch_Falls_599_01212022 - Noticing one of several tent sites within the East Fork San Gabriel River Canyon, and it seemed like quite a few of people were squatting here as opposed to temporarily camping
Devils_Gulch_Falls_603_01212022 - Dad and Mom going over one more obstacle on the way back to the East Fork Trailhead
Devils_Gulch_Falls_606_01212022 - Dad and Mom going over a pipe and up these steps as we were essentially back at Heaton Flat
Devils_Gulch_Falls_613_01212022 - Finally making it back to the East Fork Trailhead just as it got dark at the end of our January 2022 hike to Devils Gulch Falls


Devils Gulch Falls shares the same trailhead as the popular Bridge to Nowhere hike, which begins at the East Fork Trailhead.

Driving to the East Fork Trailhead is pretty straightforward so we’ll pick up the driving directions from the Azusa Ave exit off the I-210 Freeway.

Drive_to_East_Fork_Trailhead_014_iPhone_01212022 - Passing through downtown Azusa towards the mouth of San Gabriel Canyon where the Azusa Ave becomes the Hwy 39 (San Gabriel Canyon Road)
Passing through downtown Azusa towards the mouth of San Gabriel Canyon where the Azusa Ave becomes the Hwy 39 (San Gabriel Canyon Road)

Heading north on Azusa Ave, we followed it for just under 12 miles as it passed through downtown Azusa and into San Gabriel Canyon, where the road became Hwy 39.

The mountainous road skirted by the west side of the San Gabriel Reservoir before we turned right at the East Fork Road, right before a bridge near the headwaters of the reservoir.

From there, we followed the East Fork Road for a little over 5 miles before keeping left at the next turnoff (the road on the right went towards Glendora and Baldy Village).

Once onto the turnoff to stay on the East Fork Road, we then followed it to the end for the remaining 3/4-mile before reaching the parking area for the East Fork Trailhead.

Drive_to_East_Fork_Trailhead_026_iPhone_01212022 - Approaching the bridge over the head of the San Gabriel Reservoir, which was where the East Fork Road left the Hwy 39
Approaching the bridge over the head of the San Gabriel Reservoir, which was where the East Fork Road left the Hwy 39

Unfortunately, there is limited parking at this lot, which causes people to have to resort to parking alongside the road, especially on the weekends.

I can’t advise on what’s legal or not as far as roadside parking is concerned so the best advice that I can give regarding the parking situation is to either show up early or don’t come on the weekend unless you want to wait for a spot to open up.

Overall, this drive should take roughly 30 minutes (spanning the 210 Freeway exit and the end of the East Fork Road).

Because this is National Forest Land, you’re supposed to display your National Forest Adventure Pass as well as to fill out a wilderness permit (self-help kiosk next to a building across from the parking lot entrance).

Devils_Gulch_Falls_010_01212022 - Looking across the limited parking area for the East Fork Trailhead
Looking across the limited parking area for the East Fork Trailhead

For some geographical context, the city of Azusa is about 24 miles (less than 30 minutes drive without traffic) east of downtown Los Angeles, about 43 milees (over 30 minutes drive without traffic) north of Irvine, and 39 miles (over 30 minutes drive without traffic) west of Riverside.

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Pretty thorough exploration of the base of Devils Gulch Falls including the far right side


Video going from the closest profile view of Devils Gulch Falls to a more frontal view of it with tree branches in front of it


Long video showing the entire alcove area at the base of Devils Gulch Falls with close-up zoomed-in sweeps along the way


Back and forth sweep showing the frontal view of Devils Gulch Falls and a small cascade fronting it


Checking out a trickling seasonal side waterfall on the bridge to nowhere trail while also showing a hollowed out tree

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Tagged with: bridge to nowhere, east fork san gabriel river, los angeles county, east fork trail, san gabriel river, san gabriel mountains, river crossings, devils gulch, rattlesnake canyon



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Johnny Cheng

About Johnny Cheng

Johnny Cheng is the founder of the World of Waterfalls and author of the award-winning A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls. Over the last 2 decades, he has visited thousands of waterfalls in over 40 countries around the world and nearly 40 states in the USA.
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