Lower Fox Canyon Falls (Lower Falls Of The Fox)

Angeles National Forest / Tujunga / Sunland, California, USA

About Lower Fox Canyon Falls (Lower Falls Of The Fox)


Hiking Distance: at least 4 miles round-trip (lots of hazards); add optional 0.5-mile for Josephine Creek Falls
Suggested Time: allow about 4-5 hours (possibly longer depending on route-finding situations)

Date first visited: 2022-01-28
Date last visited: 2022-01-28

Waterfall Latitude: 34.30413
Waterfall Longitude: -118.17865

Waterfall Safety and Common Sense

Lower Fox Canyon Falls (or the Lower Falls of the Fox) is an elusive waterfall hidden within Fox Canyon, which itself was a tributary of Big Tujunga Canyon.

This place would typically be visited by well-equipped canyoneers rappeling or abseiling down Fox Canyon’s series of waterfalls that includes the Great Falls of the Fox.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_205_01282022 - Lower Fox Canyon Falls (or Lower Falls of the Fox)
Lower Fox Canyon Falls (or Lower Falls of the Fox)

However, mere mortals like us who hike to our waterfalls can still get a taste of Fox Canyon’s hidden gems provided you’re up for a bit of a hard adventure where you have to be willing to really get out of your comfort zone.

Case in point, we had to endure obstacles such as eroding cliff-hugging trails, a steep gully where we’re not sure we can get back up, lots of overgrowth that we had to bushwhack through, and inundating our trail shoes by slogging through water.

The ultimate reward for such efforts is a roughly 60ft waterfall that you’re likely going to have to yourself as well as a seasonal 180ft waterfall along the way.

Lower Fox Canyon Falls Adventure Summary

Such an adventure took us about 5 hours to complete in order to cover a mere 4 miles in total distance according to my GPS logs, and we definitely relied on our Topo Map app for navigation.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_296_01282022 - We definitely had moments of doubt on our Lower Fox Canyon Falls adventure, especially when we had to deal with steep terrain like this
We definitely had moments of doubt on our Lower Fox Canyon Falls adventure, especially when we had to deal with steep terrain like this

Indeed, this was pretty much an off-trail adventure where we were not quite sure if we were going to make it as doubt definitely crept in every so often throughout the excursion.

I’d have to say straight up that if you are considering pursuing Lower Fox Canyon Falls, you do so at your own risk because this is not for inexperienced hikers.

Before getting into the detailed description below, here’s a brief summary of the adventure:

  • Hike 3/4-mile to an unsigned trail junction
  • Either descend straight down to Big Tujunga River or hike 1/4-mile to bottom of Josephine Creek Falls, then bushwhack another 1/4-mile down to Big Tujunga River
  • Scramble, wade, and route-find your way for about 1/2-mile or 0.6-mile to the mouth of Fox Canyon
  • Scramble, wade, and route-find your way for about 0.4-mile to the foot of Lower Fox Canyon Falls
  • Go back the way you came



Adventure Description – Cliff Hugging Big Tujunga Canyon Trail

Although the first part of the Lower Fox Canyon Falls adventure starts off on a trail, it was actually very narrow and full of eroded sections around cliff exposure.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_032_01282022 - Cliff exposure around eroded sections of trail were definitely par for the course in the first 3/4-mile of our Lower Fox Canyon Falls adventure
Cliff exposure around eroded sections of trail were definitely par for the course in the first 3/4-mile of our Lower Fox Canyon Falls adventure

Most of this part of the hike follows the trail leading down to Josephine Creek Falls, which has its own page.

Nevertheless, the first 3/4-mile of the hike definitely tested our fear of heights as well as the traction in our shoes.

That said, it’s still a seemingly maintained trail (whether officially or not, I’m not sure) as evidenced by the presence of switchbacks as well as a large boulder with the words “Big Tujunga Canyon Trail” scrawled on it.

Perhaps the steepest part of this initial hiking section was on the last of the switchbacks (more like a bend) that descended over loose dirt between some everpresent spiky yucca plants.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_080_01282022 - Mom approaching the unsigned trail junction where the path descending to her right went to the base of Josephine Creek Falls while another path ahead of her eventually disappeared into a steep and loose gully
Mom approaching the unsigned trail junction where the path descending to her right went to the base of Josephine Creek Falls while another path ahead of her eventually disappeared into a steep and loose gully

Shortly after this bend and descent, we’d eventually reach an unsigned trail “junction”, where we had a decision to make.

Adventure Description – Pick Your Poison

From the unsigned trail junction at about 3/4-mile from the start, there was a path that continued straight ahead as well as another one that switchbacked to our right and continued along its narrow trajectory.

The path on the right descended for less than a quarter-mile more to the bottom of the seasonal Josephine Creek Falls (which you might have noticed throughout the hike, especially if it’s flowing).

Going this route, the Josephine Creek Falls makes for an intermediate goal, but in order to continue on from there, we would have to bushwhack downstream.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_305_01282022 - This context shot of Mom approaching the base of Josephine Creek Falls kind of shows you the dense vegetation beneath her to the left, which would be quite the uncomfortable bushwhack to get to Big Tujunga River
This context shot of Mom approaching the base of Josephine Creek Falls kind of shows you the dense vegetation beneath her to the left, which would be quite the uncomfortable bushwhack to get to Big Tujunga River

It wasn’t obvious to me whether there was a well-used path to make this bushwhack towards Josephine Creek’s confluence with the Big Tujunga River.

So I actually didn’t pursue doing this bushwhack given the presence of poison oak, yucca, and the likelihood of ticks getting into me under such overgrown scrambling conditions.

As for the other path that continued straight and forsaken the narrow trail to Josephine Creek Falls’ base, it initially continued as a very narrow trail, but then it quickly disappeared into a steep gully.

Although the gully at first didn’t look all that bad, it quickly became steeper (and dangerous) at about a third of the way down.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_107_01282022 - Mom sitting and scooting her way down the very steep and loose gully on her way down to the Big Tujunga River
Mom sitting and scooting her way down the very steep and loose gully on her way down to the Big Tujunga River

It even got to the point that we had to sit and scoot (more like baseball slide) our way down to the bottom, and that was when I realized that coming back up this way wasn’t going to be easy.

Moreover, us doing this descent probably loosened more of the already loose and unstable soil there, which would further conspire to erode more (and eventually become a landslide) with continued use as well as with any subsequent storms.

Indeed, this probably crosses the line of adventure versus wilderness ethics of leaving no trace, but as you can see, there’s a reason why most people don’t go to Lower Fox Canyon Falls, and this was the main reason why.

Adventure Description – Following Big Tujunga River

Once at the Big Tujunga River and the base of Big Tujunga Canyon, we then had to scramble our way downstream for roughly 1/2- to 0.6-mile.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_129_01282022 - Mom passing by some kind of camera and lighting setup within the Big Tujunga Canyon, which seemed out-of-place given how much effort and risk it took to even get down here!
Mom passing by some kind of camera and lighting setup within the Big Tujunga Canyon, which seemed out-of-place given how much effort and risk it took to even get down here!

We found it easier to cross the river and then try to follow as much open terrain as possible off the river’s northern banks.

We did find some odd evidence of people being down here, and this included a ring of sandbags as well as some kind of wildlife camera or something further downstream.

In fact, in between scrambling in the open wash flanking the Big Tujunga River, there were some presence of footprints as well as use-trails.

So clearly, people do go up and down this canyon though I’d imagine they’re mostly a combination of forest service employees, hard-core adventurers, or well-equipped canyoneers that would come down here.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_137_01282022 - Mom wading in the Big Tujunga River on her way to the mouth of Fox Canyon
Mom wading in the Big Tujunga River on her way to the mouth of Fox Canyon

Anyways, we’d eventually reach a point where further progress involved getting into the Big Tujunga River as we’d be met with a wall of overgrowth.

And after roughly another quarter-mile of slogging through the Big Tujunga River downstream, that’s when we would finally reach the mouth of Fox Canyon, which was the first side canyon we’d encounter to our right.

One thing worth mentioning about scrambling in this section of the Big Tujunga Canyon is that every so often the Big Tujunga Reservoir may be filled to the point that its headwaters may inundate the mouth of Fox Canyon.

Under such conditions, you might have to swim in order to reach Fox Canyon.

Josephine_Creek_Falls_009_01012022 - When I first came to this part of Big Tujunga Canyon on New Year's Day 2022, the Big Tujunga Reservoir was high enough to actually inundate the mouth of Fox Canyon as shown here
When I first came to this part of Big Tujunga Canyon on New Year’s Day 2022, the Big Tujunga Reservoir was high enough to actually inundate the mouth of Fox Canyon as shown here

This was definitely the case when I first came here (in pursuit of Josephine Creek Falls) about a month prior to actually pursuing Lower Falls of the Fox.

Adventure Description – Scrambling In Fox Canyon

Once at the mouth of Fox Canyon, we then scrambled upstream along Fox Creek for about 0.4-mile to reach the foot of Lower Fox Canyon Falls.

This scramble pretty much involved a lot of route-finding as there wasn’t an obvious trail-of-use that we were able to follow.

So we found ourselves, doing a combination of stream scrambling before the water either became too deep or the overgrowth was too thick, and then we’d climb up the loose embankments to reach higher, drier ground.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_152_01282022 - Context of Mom route-finding her way in Fox Canyon in the final stretch leading to the Lower Fox Canyon Falls
Context of Mom route-finding her way in Fox Canyon in the final stretch leading to the Lower Fox Canyon Falls

I think on the way to the falls, we actually crossed Fox Creek at least 3 or 4 times before finally getting to the bottom of the falls.

However, on the way out, we stuck to the east side of Fox Creek, which served us for most of the way until it became overgrown and steep beneath a side gully.

Then, we pretty much stream scrambled to the canyon mouth (so we probably could have gotten away with some mild dry hiking on the west side of Fox Creek in that lower section).

At the base of Lower Fox Canyon Falls, we were able to scramble right up to its foot without too much difficulty though I can definitely see how this scramble could be more overgrown and rough with poison oak everywhere later in the season.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_232_01282022 - Full view of the Lower Fox Canyon Falls surrounded by a lot of bare trees, which would conspire to block the views later in the year when they would have sprouted leaves on their branches
Full view of the Lower Fox Canyon Falls surrounded by a lot of bare trees, which would conspire to block the views later in the year when they would have sprouted leaves on their branches

Our visit took place in late January 2022, where the trees still didn’t sprout leaves, so we were able to get some decent all-encompassing distant views.

That said, once the trees sprout leaves, then I can envision that the views would start to get blocked and that you’d have to scramble all the way to the bottom to get a clean look again (though it’d be hard to get it all in one photograph from that close).

Getting A Sneak Peak At Lower Fox Canyon Falls

With all the trouble and risk that it took us to reach the Lower Falls of the Fox, we found out that there was one way to get a sneak peak at this waterfall to determine whether it would be worth the effort or not.

The key is that you can actually catch a distant glimpse of the Lower Fox Canyon Falls from the Fall Creek Falls hike.

Fall_Creek_Falls_005_01282022 - Looking in the distance towards the Lower Fox Canyon Falls from the Fall Creek Falls fire road
Looking in the distance towards the Lower Fox Canyon Falls from the Fall Creek Falls fire road

The view into the Lower Fox Canyon was roughly a quarter-mile into the start of that hike.

You’ll really need to pay attention in order to spot it, especially if there’s a lot of shadows concealing the waterfall within the shade of the canyon.

Authorities

Lower Fox Canyon Falls (or Lower Falls of the Fox) resides in the Angeles National Forest near Pasadena in Los Angeles County, California. It is administered by the USDA Forest Service. For information or inquiries about the area as well as current conditions, visit their website or Facebook page.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_004_01282022 - Looking up towards the end of the wide pullout, which was where the hike to Josephine Creek Falls began
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_007_01282022 - It's definitely disturbing to see litter on the hillside at the start of the Lower Fox Canyon Falls adventure
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_010_01282022 - Mom starting on the hike leading to the Lower Fox Canyon Falls, which in her mind was already sketchy due to the narrow, eroded nature of the trail
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_014_01282022 - After the first bend, we pretty much followed this trail flanked by yucca with some mild cliff exposure to our left
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_017_01282022 - Mom carefully making her way along the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail where erosion and slippery, narrow footing definitely placed a bit of doubt in her mind about this adventure
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_019_01282022 - Most of the sketchy eroded sections of the cliff-hugging trail actually occurred in the first few minutes of the hike
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_029_01282022 - Context of Mom on the narrow Big Tujunga Canyon Trail where you can see how quickly the slope drops off
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_039_01282022 - Another look at Mom on the narrow Big Tujunga Canyon Trail in the beginning of our adventure
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_040_01282022 - Context of Mom on the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail with Fox Canyon in the distance. Yep, we have to eventually go into that canyon
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_041_01282022 - Mom skirting by some prickly yucca plants, where brushing up against them was inevitable on a narrow trail like this
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_048_01282022 - Eventually, the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail veered into the morning sun as the path started to descend a handful of switchbacks
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_050_01282022 - While going down the switchbacks, it seemed like the worst of the narrow and eroded cliff-hugging sections were over
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_054_01282022 - Mom going past a boulder with the inscription 'Big Tujunga Canyon Trail' scrawled on it
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_055_01282022 - Mom continuing down the 'benign' part of the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail en route to Lower Fox Canyon Falls
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_058_01282022 - Context of Mom on the switchbacking Big Tujunga Canyon Trail with Josephine Creek Falls barely hanging onto its flow in the background
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_061_01282022 - Mom going down another one of the handful of switchbacks on the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail. Such switchbacks made me wonder if this trail was officially maintained since most unsanctioned scrambling paths lack switchbacks
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_066_01282022 - Mom descending towards perhaps the steepest part of the switchbacking Big Tujunga Canyon Trail on the way to the unsigned Josephine Creek Falls junction
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_069_01282022 - As much as the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail seemed benign during the initial switchbacks, there were still narrow sections of the trail. Maybe after the initial stretch, we were mentally more conditioned to be used to such cliff exposure so it didn't seem as bad as the start
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_073_01282022 - Mom negotiating a particularly narrow part of the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail, where I'm sure if this part was gone then I'm not sure how we'd get down to both Josephine Creek Falls and the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_076_01282022 - Context of Mom descending perhaps the steepest switchback with Josephine Creek Falls in the background
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_083_01282022 - On the way down to Lower Fox Canyon Falls, we opted to continue on a path that disappeared into a steep and eroded gully
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_085_01282022 - Context of Mom making the steep descent to the Big Tujunga River, which initially didn't seem all that bad
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_088_01282022 - But it didn't take long before Mom had to negotiate some sketchy and steep sections, where progress really was slow and our confidence was undermined
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_089_01282022 - Mom trying to maintain her balance and footing on this really steep section of our descent to the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_092_01282022 - Looking up at Mom carefully making her way down this sketchy part of the steep descent to the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_096_01282022 - Mom reaching this somewhat 'flat' set of 'steps' on the way down to the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_100_01282022 - Mom continuing on the rapidly disappearing path as we still had more to go on our steep descent to the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_102_01282022 - Mom descending to the next really steep part of the descent to the level of the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_104_01282022 - Mom carefully descending these next 'steps' on the way down to the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_105_01282022 - Now, the descent was starting to get real
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_110_01282022 - Mom baseball sliding her way down the really steep remainder of the descent to the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_111_01282022 - Looking back up at the marks we left behind as part of our scooting and sliding efforts down the steepest part of the gully
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_116_01282022 - Finally making it down to the level of the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_117_01282022 - Mom crossing the Big Tujunga River as we started to make our way towards Fox Canyon from within Big Tujunga Canyon
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_120_01282022 - Mom in an open part of the Big Tujunga Canyon somewhere to the east and north of the Big Tujunga River itself
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_122_01282022 - Given how sketchy it was to make it down to the Big Tujunga River, this ring of sandbags seemed out-of-place. But it just goes to show you that there have been and will continue to be some intrepid people who do explore the floor of Big Tujunga Canyon
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_123_01282022 - Mom negotiating this overgrown part of the canyon scramble when the use-trail disappeared and we had to route-find our way to the next open patch of land
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_124_01282022 - Mom continuing to follow some trails of use alongside the Big Tujunga River in pursuit of the Lower Fox Canyon Falls
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_126_01282022 - Back in another open part of the Big Tujunga Canyon
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_128_01282022 - Mom continuing to navigate her way through the open wash before going through the next patch of overgrowth within Big Tujunga Canyon
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_131_01282022 - Mom and I found this 'corridor' between overgrowth and the cliff walls within Big Tujunga Canyon, which helped a lot
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_132_01282022 - Continuing along the somewhat open 'corridor' between overgrowth and the cliff walls at the floor of Big Tujunga Canyon
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_136_01282022 - Eventually the corridor ran into a thick grove of overgrowth and the best way forward was to get wet in the Big Tujunga River
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_139_01282022 - Mom and I eventually made it to the mouth of Fox Canyon where we then left the Big Tujunga Canyon and started scrambling up Fox Creek
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_140_01282022 - Mom and I initially thought wading through Fox Creek was the way to go, but it didn't take long before there was too much overgrowth to make it attractive compared to some of the dry hiking options on either side of Fox Creek
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_145_01282022 - I noticed this side gully within Fox Canyon though it was dry, but I'd imagine under much wetter (and dangerous) conditions, there's likely to be an ephemeral waterfall here
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_147_01282022 - Looking across Fox Canyon towards some intriguing wet and stained cliff
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_149_01282022 - Looking back at Mom doing some dry hiking while trying to avoid yucca in this stretch of Fox Canyon
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_151_01282022 - Mom entering the next patch of overgrowth, but in this stretch, we still stuck to our guns and kept to the right of Fox Creek
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_153_01282022 - Mom dodging more yucca on our way to the Lower Fox Canyon Falls
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_156_01282022 - Mom approaching a rockslide or landslide area, where we really had to be wary of any loose soil or rocks that might conspire to bury us and/or make us stuck
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_158_01282022 - Mom descending in another stretch as we were getting closer to Lower Fox Canyon Falls
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_159_01282022 - Looking back at the Fox Canyon just to see how far up this canyon we had gone
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_161_01282022 - Mom trying to figure out how to get through this yucca patch without getting stabbed
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_163_01282022 - Finally starting to approach Lower Fox Canyon Falls
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_166_01282022 - Starting to get cleaner looks at the Lower Fox Canyon Falls the closer we went
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_181_01282022 - Finally making it to the base of Lower Fox Canyon Falls
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_193_01282022 - Looking right up the Lower Fox Canyon Falls from its base
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_211_01282022 - Context of Mom standing before the Lower Fox Canyon Falls to provide a sense of scale
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_223_01282022 - Another look at the Lower Fox Canyon Falls and its confines
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_225_01282022 - Another contextual look at the Lower Fox Canyon Falls
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_240_01282022 - Taking a closer look at my Altra Lone Peak 5 Trail Running Shoes, which actually did pretty well for such an uncomfortably rugged hike like this
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_242_01282022 - Last look back at Lower Fox Canyon Falls before heading out
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_254_01282022 - Mom going back through the landslide section within Fox Canyon
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_260_01282022 - Mom descending from the steep side gully down towards the level of Fox Creek on the way back out
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_268_01282022 - Mom making her way back to the Big Tujunga River after having left Fox Canyon
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_281_01282022 - Mom wading through the Big Tujunga River on our way back out
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_292_01282022 - Mom going back across Big Tujunga River on our way back to the Josephine Creek drainage
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_293_01282022 - Unfortunately, we didn't find a suitable path up Josephine Creek to bushwhack through so we opted to go back up the way we knew earlier, which was to take that steep and eroded gully back up!
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_301_01282022 - Looking up at Mom making it past the steepest part of the ascent (and trying to dodge any rocks she had kicked down) before making it to these 'steps'
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_304_01282022 - When we made it back up to the Josephine Creek Falls Trail, we knew we were pretty much home free
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_311_01282022 - We took a brief break at the foot of Josephine Creek Falls, which was still flowing (but barely) about a month after I was last here when it had flowed much better
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_316_01282022 - Context of Mom standing at the foot of Josephine Creek Falls in low flow
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_319_01282022 - Mom taking some time to put on her wool hiking socks so the ascent could be a little less miserable
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_322_01282022 - Unlike Lower Fox Canyon Falls, there was some litter at the foot of Josephine Creek Falls
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_337_01282022 - Mom making her way back up the Josephine Creek Falls Trail and eventually back up to the Big Tujunga Canyon Road
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_338_01282022 - Mom negotiating this very narrow and eroded part of the Josephine Creek Falls Trail
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_340_01282022 - Looking back at the steep bend before Josephine Creek Falls
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_341_01282022 - Context of Mom going back up the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail with Fox Canyon in the distance
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_342_01282022 - Mom making her way back up the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail with Josephine Creek Falls sinking lower in the distance
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_349_01282022 - Mom approaching the Big Tujunga Canyon Road as we were in the home stretch to end this adventure
Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_357_01282022 - Just to give you an idea of how rugged this adventure was, my trail running shoes definitely got a lot of pebbles and sediment inside them


Lower Fox Canyon Falls actually shares the same trailhead as that of Josephine Creek Falls, which has its own page, but I’ll reproduce the driving directions here for convenience.

There are two driving approaches – one via Sunland and the other via La Canada-Flintridge.

Either way, we’re going to start the driving description from the 210 Freeway at Pasadena (which is north of downtown Los Angeles).

Drive_to_Fox_Canyon_TH_011_iPhone_01282022 - Driving up the Big Tujunga Canyon Road which goes along the north face of Josephine Peak, which is seen up ahead in this photo
Driving up the Big Tujunga Canyon Road which goes along the north face of Josephine Peak, which is seen up ahead in this photo

So from the 210 Freeway at Pasadena, we headed west towards Sunland and the Sunland Blvd exit.

Then, we turned right onto Sunland Blvd and followed this busy street for 3/4-mile to Oro Vista Ave. or 1.5 miles to Mt Gleason Rd.

You can turn left at either of those streets, and both streets will eventually deposit you to the Big Tujunga Canyon Road.

From where Oro Vista Ave became Big Tujunga Canyon Rd, we followed Big Tujunga Rd for a little over 10 miles to the large pullout area on the left (north side of Big Tujunga Canyon Rd) on the left (just past the Big Tujunga Dam Overlook).

Josephine_Creek_Falls_251_01012022 - The start of the hike to Lower Fox Canyon Falls adventure was not much further past the Big Tujunga Dam Overlook
The start of the hike to Lower Fox Canyon Falls adventure was not much further past the Big Tujunga Dam Overlook

This long pullout would be a little over 5 miles from the Clear Creek Station going in the opposite direction on Big Tujunga Canyon Road.

Note that the 7-11 shop at Oro Vista Ave also sold Angeles Forest passes, which you’d need to display in your vehicle anywhere you park within the boundaries of the Angeles National Forest.

In addition, if the Clear Creek Ranger Station (by the Angeles Crest Highway) is open, then you can also pay cash to get Forest Service Adventure Passes from there as well.

Lower_Fox_Canyon_Falls_001_01282022 - The pullout fronting the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail, which was actually quite wide even though there was no telling sign indicating the start of the hike
The pullout fronting the Big Tujunga Canyon Trail, which was actually quite wide even though there was no telling sign indicating the start of the hike

Finally, to give you some idea of the geographical context, Pasadena was about 13 miles (20 minutes drive without traffic) from Sunland, 11 miles (anywhere from 20-60 minutes depending on traffic) from downtown Los Angeles, 34 miles (about 45 minutes without traffic) from Santa Clarita, and 56 miles (over an hour drive without traffic) from Irvine.

Find A Place To Stay



Booking.com

Long video showing the approach to Lower Fox Canyon Falls from a distance before going up to the base of the falls


Long video starting with full view of Lower Fox Canyon Falls before delibrately going up to its base and panning up and down the falls from a few different spots


Slow and deliberate thorough exploration of the immediate base of Lower Fox Canyon Falls

Related Top 10 Lists

No Posts Found

Tagged with: sunland, tujunga, angeles national forest, los angeles, angeles crest, southern california, california, waterfall, fox canyon, big tujunga river, big tujunga creek, josephine creek



Visitor Comments:

Got something you'd like to share or say to keep the conversation going? Feel free to leave a comment below...

No users have replied to the content on this page


Share your thoughts about what you've read on this page

You must be logged in to submit content. Refresh this page after you have logged in.

Visitor Reviews of this Waterfall:

If you have a waterfall story or write-up that you'd like to share, feel free to click the button below and fill out the form...

No users have submitted a write-up/review of this waterfall


Have you been to a waterfall? Submit a write-up/review and share your experiences or impressions

Review A Waterfall

Nearest Waterfalls

The Waterfaller Newsletter

The Waterfaller Newsletter is where we curate the wealth of information on the World of Waterfalls website and deliver it to you in bite-sized chunks in your email inbox. You'll also get exclusive content like...

  • Waterfall Wednesdays
  • Insider Tips
  • User-submitted Waterfall Write-up of the Month
  • and the latest news and updates both within the website as well as around the wonderful world of waterfalls


How To Build A Profitable Travel Blog In 4 Steps

Johnny Cheng

About Johnny Cheng

Johnny Cheng is the founder of the World of Waterfalls and author of the award-winning A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls. Over the last 2 decades, he has visited thousands of waterfalls in over 40 countries around the world and nearly 40 states in the USA.
Read More About Johnny | A Guide to New Zealand Waterfalls.